Humpty Dumpty's Guide to Healthy Eating for Kids

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Buy Humpty Dumpty's Guide to Healthy Eating for Kids

Educating young readers about healthy food choices using the classic fairy tale character, Humpty Dumpty along with new cartoon characters the two eggs from space Zork and Zork, and Lucky the Cat. Kids laugh and learn as they explore various fruits and vegetables drawn in a fun cartoon style. Attention grabbing color drawings help to illustrate healthy food choices and habits in a entertaining manner for children. Great to read to your kids or have them read along with you.

Artwork examples from Humpty's Book

dentist visit Humpty Dumpty Cowboy


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This is the coloring book edition.
 
Humpty Dumpty

Kids will learn about nutrition while having fun coloring pictures. Educating young readers about healthy food choices using the classic fairy tale character, Humpty Dumpty along with new cartoon characters the two eggs from space Zork and Zork, and Lucky the Cat. Kids laugh and learn as they explore various fruits and vegetables drawn in a fun cartoon style. Kids will learn as they exercise their art skills by coloring in the pages.

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Humpty Dumpty the Fairy Tale Background Information

Humpty Dumpty is orginally a character in an English nursery rhyme, probably originally a riddle and one of the best known in the English-speaking world. He is typically portrayed as an anthropomorphic egg, though he is not explicitly described so. The first recorded versions of the rhyme date from late eighteenth-century England and the tune from 1870 in James William Elliott's National Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs.

The character of Humpty Dumpty was popularized in the United States by actor George L. Fox (1825–77). As a character and literary allusion, he has appeared or been referred to in a large number of works of literature and popular culture, particularly Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass (1872).

The rhyme is one of the best known and most popular in the English language. The most common modern text is:

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the king's horses and all the king's men
Couldn't put Humpty together again.

Humpty Dumpty" was also eighteenth-century slang for a short and clumsy person.

The Humpty Dumpty rhyme does not actually state that Humpty is an egg. There are also various theories of an original "Humpty Dumpty". One, advanced by Katherine Elwes Thomas in 1930 and adopted by Robert Ripley, posits that Humpty Dumpty is King Richard III of England, depicted as humpbacked in Tudor histories and particularly in Shakespeare's play, and who was defeated, despite his armies, at Bosworth Field in 1485.

In Through the Looking-Glass

Humpty appears in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass (1872), where he discusses semantics and pragmatics with Alice. This book is a sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Humpty Dumpty and Alice in Wonderland
Humpty Dumpty and Alice drawing from Through the Looking-Glass. Illustration by John Tenniel.

From "Through the Looking Glass"
"I don't know what you mean by 'glory,' " Alice said.
Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. "Of course you don't—till I tell you. I meant 'there's a nice knock-down argument for you!' "
"But 'glory' doesn't mean 'a nice knock-down argument'," Alice objected.
"When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less."
"The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."
"The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master—that's all."

Alice was too much puzzled to say anything, so after a minute Humpty Dumpty began again. "They've a temper, some of them—particularly verbs, they're the proudest—adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs—however, I can manage the whole lot! Impenetrability! That's what I say!"

"The face is what one goes by, generally," Alice remarked in a thoughtful tone.
"That's just what I complain of," said Humpty Dumpty. "Your face is the same as everybody has—the two eyes,—" (marking their places in the air with his thumb) "nose in the middle, mouth under. It's always the same. Now if you had the two eyes on the same side of the nose, for instance—or the mouth at the top—that would be some help.

Why Humpty Dumpty to Promote Health and Fitness

Humpty Dumpty may not be the first thing you think of when contemplating health and fitness, but I liked the idea of using such a simple character universally known by children, who in a way represents the average guy. When you think of Humpty Dumpty you don't think of a super athlete. You think of a clumsy egg that falls off a wall. A lot of us these days look a lot like Humpty. Personally, I can relate to Humpty's coordination skills. I'm always bumping my head on something. I think perhaps kids might listen to someone who is flawed and just trying to do what's right. In this case, in my book, "Humpty Dumpty's Guide to Healthy Eating for Kids" Humpty is learning about health and fitness from two unlikely sources, the Zorks Alien Eggs from Space. The Zorks teach  Humpty about the vitamins and health benefits found in healthy vegetables such as broccoli, asparagus, bananas, kale, blueberries, and they even enlighten Humpty on the benefits of eating garlic, in a fun way of course. Yes, the Zorks take on the appearance of vampires, non-threatening vampires of course to promote the benefits of garlic.

The Importance of Healthy Living for Kids

One of the reasons I created , "Humpty Dumpty's Guide to Healthy Eating for Kids"  for kids is that kids are overwhelmed with unhealthy influences. Fast food is everywhere and always available. Kids ask for junk food, and they get it. The only way to get kids to eat healthy is, first of all, to get healthy foods in front of them so they can eat healthy. The next thing is to teach them why they should eat healthy foods. Teach them what fruits and vegetables can do for them, and let them know healthy foods do not taste bad. The object of my book is to make eating healthy appear fun as well as beneficial to kids using colorful cartoon characters. Fast food and junk food companies have been using cartoon characters to push processed fast food burgers, fries, cakes, and most popularly sugar loaded cereals for years, so why  not use cartoon characters for good.

I'm like everybody else I grew up with Ronald the fast food clown and all those cereal brands whose mascots included talking tigers, leprechauns, wizards, and even the Flintstones. Oh, and don't forget those cool prizes that weren't worth more than 10 cents. I wonder how many mothers would have saved money and their kids teeth by just buying their child a 50 cent toy to avoid buying a more expensive box of sugar loaded cereal. As an adult, I look back fondly at all the fun cartoon characters I was exposed to on television and elsewhere as a child, so my goal is to not throw out that cartoon magic that kids enjoy, but just to redirect it into something more positive.

So give Humpty and his friends Lucky Cat and the Zorks a try. Maybe your kids will start asking to try new foods that are green and healthy in nature. Every good thing starts with one step in the right direction. Order Humpty Dumpty's Guide to Healthy Eating for Kids today.